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discusses his book "syria: the fall of the house of assad". >> thank youpa so much fors spending part of your afternoon with us here. behal myseuld like to welcome you all on behalf of david lesch and myself. this is a wonderful session.our. we're so happy they your here.ss i wanted to introduce david lesch to you. he is a professor of middle east history at trinity university iy san antonio.nker a prolific writer and thinker ot the middle east and what is t' happening in the region.e it's a treat to have him here today. he has written his new bookyriat "syria: the fall of the house of assad", which i'm hoping you you sign all purchase debt and assigned. again and sign my copy first. he has met extensively witheadi president assad and leading bete syrian officials.n the he has been in the middle east,, studying the middle east, makin, connections and reason that's he important is, of course, hee'son knows of what speaks. to write n without understanding the players, and lucky for us professor lesch knows quite a bit about what is happening in syria and can answer some of the very impo
. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
have their only naval base outside the former soviet union in syria. ladies and gentlemen, the russians are a very big part of this problem. i would not assume that the united states is the main issue here. if the russians and the chinese play ball on this, this could've been resolved a long time ago. but my sense is pessimistic. my sense, it's probably too late to put humpty dumpty of syria back together again. it has festered too long. all of this time that something could have been done, pretty much nothing was done except to make the situation worse. all of the talk in the united nations, and elsewhere, and the talk of a cease-fire, these are not solutions. this is talk. it's too late. it's too unclear. it's too fractious. how many in this room could name the opposition? how many in this room have a clear view of who the opposition is? or will be? on a danger to the united states, to the gcc and others? do we know this? are we going to hand weapons to them? i remember a reporter from "the wall street journal" asking me as the revolution was going on in libya, whose the opposition, d
envoy warned that syria risks becoming a failed state like somalia. in syria, self activists said more than 100 people were killed across the country, including the brother of syria's parliament speaker. >> for months, the syrian president's army has been hunting down opposition activists. rebels have been attacked with bombs and grenades. this internet footage is thought to show a city not far from homs ,. seven people were reported killed in this attack alone. russia's foreign minister met with jordan's foreign minister. he also held private talks with the former syrian prime minister. the former assad ally defected to the opposition in august. he faces tough questions about why russia continues to supply assad with weapons. >> we are only honoring contracts that were agreed some time ago. the supplies have nothing to do with the current conflict. they are merely supposed to help syria provide for its own defense. that includes defending itself against air attacks. >> that sort of rhetoric rings hollow to many in syria. for them, the deaths of friends and family have become a daily r
a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque. meanwhile, rebels say they have taken one of the two remaining government-controlled posts along the turkish border. in a rare interview, bashar al- assad was defiant. speaking to russian television, he ruled out the possibility he might go into exile. >> i am syrian. i will live and die in syria. >> assad warned the west against military intervention in the country and said such a move would have global ramifications and warned any intervention would have what he called a domino effect. meanwhile, syrian opposition politici
sanctions against syria in their effort to stop its civil war. welcome to nhk world "newsline." representatives of nations putting the squeeze on the syrian government have met all over the world. their latest gathering brought them here to japan. the delegates worked on their strategy to push president bashar al assad out of office and ultimately end the bloodshed. on one hand, they're strengthening sangings. on the other, they're reaffirming their support for opposition forces. nhk world's akira saheki reports. >> reporter: delegates from more than 60 countries are attending the conference, including representatives from the gulf region and the west. they've met several times before, but this is the first time they've gathered in asia. the japanese government hosted the conference to help broaden the base of international support for sanctions against syria. >> translator: the international community has been asking the syrian government to end the violence. but the assad regime is continuing the fight, ignoring the sacrifices of its people. we need to unify our efforts and
in new york as the region struggles to recover from the super storm sandy. >> syria and eu membership on the agenda and talks between angela merkel and the turkish prime minister. >> european and north african countries have kicked off negotiations on a huge solar energy project in the sahara desert. u.s. president barack obama has arrived in new jersey to tour the devastation left in the wake of super storm sandy. >> obama was joined by new jersey governor chris christie, who is republican, but christie has praised the way the president has handled the crisis. they viewed storm damage by helicopter. obama will also be meeting with residents and emergency workers. >> cleanup work is in full swing on the east coast after sandy flooded cities, washed out bridges, and caused billions of dollars in damage. >> but new york city is making it clear it is back in business. mayor michael bloomberg rate in the opening bell at the new york stock exchange, which was closed for two days. >> the storm killed over 40 people on the east coast and caused unprecedented damage. >> life is slowly returni
on syria. >> i believe that assad must go. >> assad has to go. >> i don't want to have our military involved in syria. >> for us to get more entangled militarily in syria is a serious step. >> so the right course for us is working through our partners -- >> -- in consultation with our partners -- >> -- to identify responsible parties within syria. >> mobilizing the moderate forces. >> organize them. >> helping the operation organize. >> we need to make sure -- >> making absolutely certain -- >> that they don't have arms -- >> -- arms ? >> the wrong hands. >> to hurt us down the road. (. >> (both together) thank you. (cheers and applause) >> jon: wow, what the hell was that? on foreign policy it appears that all that's left for the presidential race is this one model. i mean, at least we still get our choice of color but it's the same model! (laughter) what the hell's romney up to? the whole debate was a tour of bizarro land. here's romney on the afghanistan withdrawal. >> well, we're going to be finished by 2014 and when i'm president we'll make sure we bring our troops out by the e
people across syria are dealing with a nationwide internet blackout and a top official at the united nations has harsh words about the deadly civil war which has stretched on for more than a year. the details are next. and powerful storms are smacking the west coast with heavy rain and winds. ♪ [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need? open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so don't wait. now's the time to get on a path that could be right for you... with unitedhealthcare medicare solutions. call today to learn about the kinds of coverage we offer, including aarp medicarecomplete plans insured through unitedhealthcare. these medicare advantage plans can combine parts a and b, your hospital and doctor coverage... with part d prescription drug coverage, and extra benefits... all in one complete plan... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to cha
. >> and seeking clarity -- german chancellor angel merkel on how to develop renewable energy. we begin in syria where the military is currently stepping up its use of airpower in an effort to defeat the rebels. >> opposition forces say at least 70 people have been killed in an air strike near the turkish border. meanwhile, a video emerges of what appears to be opposition fighters executing government soldiers. >> the un says that if the video is authenticated, the action would constitute a war crime. >> as their prisoners cower in terror, rebels celebrate. this video is said to of been recorded in northwestern syria. government forces and rebels have been fighting there for weeks. on thursday, rebels stormed several army checkpoints. they appear to have captured these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after that, they fired round after round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is trying to verify the video and says the killings probably constituted a war crime and those responsible should be pu
with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shift
not be such a big difference. >> right, the key issue was the head of many of the imminent issues. like syria. >> yes, syria. syria, most likely will continue to be a central relationship. but this is a current affair that will likely be settled in another way. the problem is that we do not have any new agenda with the united states, we are still digesting the remnants of the cold war. >> sorry that we cannot speak longer. it was good to get your perspective. thank you. much more reaction coming through all the time, that is it from washington, d.c. for now. we have had an extraordinary night, let's remind ourselves of the highlights of this u.s. presidents election. >> i just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. his supporters and campaign also deserve congratulations. >> we will forever be the united states of america. we will continue our journey forward. this is why we live in the greatest nation on earth. thank you, america. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new yor
approach. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran, how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead, and then what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring. probably the better term is the arab awakening, and we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls, and it's going to vary country to country, and it's going to take a long time. but look, it was inevitable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back. and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people, and we should do everything we can in a smart way recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria, and i'm more worried about syria in term
obama facing a world of challenges in his second term. from iran's nuclear ambitions to syria's bloody civil war, spilling into neighboring countries now where the president has a lot on his plate. now he has a second chance to tackle a lot of these complex world problems. nicolas burns, former undersecretary for political affairs and was the lead u.s. negotiator on iran's nuclear program. ambassador burns, joining us here. the president has a ton on his plate now. i want to start off with iran. the president criticized throughout the campaign for not being tougher on iran when it comes to his nuclear ambitions for not drawing more of a clear red line, if you will, and we saw israeli president benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister there, famously at the u.n. nick, what do you think is the biggest challenge that the president has to deal with for iran? >> well, you know, suzanne, i think the president has a lot of support here in the united states, and he certainly does around the world for his basic policy, which is we should try negotiations with the iranians before we think about th
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
or syria you will see that in each of these cases there are significant cases funding and model was hard to do. people like to fight the eastern european case because it was successful. the problem there is there wasn't a nato membership in the e.u. but helped to really drive that political role and meet the commitment of the government to undertake the reform. certainly for a country like tunisia. what they're looking at interestingly enough are the cases of south korea, taiwan and south africa as examples of places that have undergone a similar authoritarian transitions to the space rule, particular emphasis on the police and internal capability. >> i'm very glad you mentioned those last few cases that may in fact pulled out some opportunities from learning because if we hadn't integrated that possibility into the way this group responded to the question i would have underscored just how potentially significance the absence of prior model is for the securities sector reform in the arab world because it causes a great deal about the limited validity of what we often think about as best
military says it has scored direct hits on targets in syria as israeli tanks opened fire after a syrian mortar shell landed at an israeli base in the golan heights. israel warning the united nations that while the response is measured this time, it will respond with greater force if is syria's civil war continued to spill over the border into israel. the israeli strike was the first direct engagement with syria in nearly 40 years. this image shows the destruction in the goal hahn heights during the 1973 yom kippur war. we'll have much more on the developing story. jenna: a frightening robbery caught on camera. how police think the suspects may have used superstorm sandy to their advantage. we'll have that. >>> dozens of people left homeless after a deadly house explosion destroys an entire main hood. what caused this blast? we're live with the latest on that mystery next. rick: right now some new information on some crime stories we're keeping an eye on for you. testimony concluding in the preliminary hearing for an american soldier charged with killing 16 afghan civilians. staff sergea
in a piece in the wall street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. i'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambass do, who had nothing to do with benghazi? and was simply making a presentation based on intel jeps that she had received? and to besmirch her reputation? is outra
will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the i
to of been coed in northwestern syria. governmentorces and rebels have been fighti there for weeks. on thursy, rebstoed several army checkpoints. they appear to haveapred these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after tt, the fired rnd afte round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is trying to verify the video and says the killings probably constituted a war crime and those responsible should be punished. >> it looks very likely that this is a war crime, another one. unfortunately, this uld be the latest in a stream of documented executions byppitn wl as government forces and its affiliated with them. >> there's been heavy fighting with government planes bombing rebel positions near the turkish border awe as in the capital damasc. >> the conflict between the government and rebels in syria has met mer for millions of people. >> the united nations says it is having trouble collecting money pledged to help alleviate their plight. the itatnsays member states have promised some 270 million euros
in defending its border with syria. >> ankara wants to deploy peace missiles, which are designed to shoot down rockets and other missiles. >> the climate will first have to go to parliament for approval. >> for months, fighting between syrian rebels and the army has threatened to spill over into turkey. the turkish government wants patriot missile batteries deployed along its border. ankara has asked nato to send patriots and their crews, and some are likely to come from germany. berlin says it supports the plan. >> it would be a grave mistake if we were to refuse defensive support to a fellow nato country at a time when that country sees itself as being attacked from outside by a neighbor. >> patriot missiles can shoot down aircraft as well as incoming missiles. the u.s., the netherlands, and germany are the only nato countries which have the most recent versions of the technology, which means any deployment could see german soldiers stationed on turkey's border with syria. experts expect about 170 troops to be deployed. the government has already signaled its intent. >> we are waiting. that
of the entire region. syria, and the disorder spills across the neighborhood. joining us again, and fbi supervisory agent. you see that as late? >> what is happening in syria, you have to look at it from a few different perspectives. first you have the syrian people who want freedom from bashar al-assad's regime. then you have regional conflict that is going on. this is between iran and turkey. turkey is supporting the iranian people and iran is supporting the regime. you also have to look at it on a different level. where you have russia and china also involved on global levels with the syrian conflict. it is becoming a war of shadows and a war of different phones. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this
of the drivers, although not an age when but one that is critical has been weapons coming into syria, including from russia. even this week the turks forced a plane to land. it was crossing in their airspace. allegedly carrying weapons for assad's government. how has the president we set with russia increased american influence in moscow? so that one would think the president could convince the russians to act differently. and then i would ask you, dov, to respond or to explain how governor romney in his approach to america's leadership in the world plate carefully so that america might have more influence in stopping the killing in syria? >> so, the reset with russia was simply taking a very clear guide approach and recognizing that you're going to have inches that you can cooperate on an interests were you see things very different way. in areas like arms control, reducing the nuclear danger, nuclear proliferation and, of course, want to cooperate with russia. in areas where the agreed to allow supplies to come through russian territory to support our troops in afghanistan, of course want to
street gorm, that they are coming back everywhere in iraq, in afghanistan, in syria. they're all over the place. so it interferes with the president's narrative. we got bin laden, al qaeda's on the run, therefore, i am a great command in chief. the fact is everything's unraveling in the missed east. >> greta: straight ahead, not just senator mccain, tonight, senator lindy graham firing back. we are here to talk about the heated battle, next. and the real war on women. some women say they are censored by facebook. who are they? allen west, fighting a tough election battle. hew he just got big-name backup. years ago, my doctor told me to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how
's ahead on cnn international. thousands escape the violence in syria, and flood across the border into neighboring turkey setting off another humanitarian crisis. >>> and with the election faebl over, the american people are ready for specifics on how washington plans to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. we're going to hear from the president next hour with his plan. ple making stuff. companies have to invest in making things. infrastructure, construction, production. we need it now more than ever. chevron's putting more than $8 billion dollars back in the u.s. economy this year. in pipes, cement, steel, jobs, energy. we need to get the wheels turning. i'm p. making real things... for real. ...that make a real difference. ♪ out for drinks, eats. i have very well fitting dentures. i like to eat a lot of fruits. love them all. the seal i get with the super poligrip free keeps the seeds from getting up underneath. even well-fitting dentures let in food particles. super poligrip is zinc free. with just a few dabs, it's clinically proven to seal out more food particles so you're more
: what do. the next move is for syria? -- what do you think the next move is? guest: the top general in britain said they would be considering a move there. there's a conversation but in washington and other international capitals of their needs to be something done. winter is coming. you may not know this, but winter in syria is quite cold. those who have been displaced from their homes, there is, i think, 35,000 casualties in the 19th month of this civil war. host: here's a tweet from david cameron. given what you have just said about syria, could there be pressure from our allies to make a bolder move in syria? guest: the u.s. is already doing something. it does not seem like there is additional pressure. the rest of the u.s. allies, turkey, they are afraid of getting involved. the only pressure, or the most active countries right now we're probably -- are probably qatar and saudi arabia. we have troops and special forces along the border who are vetting who those bombs get delivered to. it is unclear exactly what the status of that is right now, but i do not feel that allies, as
called the zero obama's policy towards syria -- called the obama's policy toward syria shameful. this is just about one hour. >> good afternoon. the last session before lunch, the good guys, the special burden on democratic nations. we have a star-studded cast and i will hand it over to our moderator, kathleen koch. >> . ruhle for joining us today. the title of our panel in and of itself, "the good guys?" it reflects the self doubt that many of us have had today house we'll lot at a recent intervention in countries like iraq, afghanistan. we asked ourselves, were we the good guys? did we get it right? did we do the right thing? did we do more harm than good? in our panel today, i would like us not to look back, not to rehash the past, but let's look forward and really reflect on the lessons learned in these interventions and see how they can inform the actions of our communities of democracies as we move forward into the future. first, we have a panel that virtually needs no introduction but i will briefly introduce them. juan carlos pinzo. senator john mccain. someone who i hav
, including a look at military power and the situation in syria. in a little more than two hours, sent a leader harry reid on the filibuster. after that, we will re-air the comments of chief justice roberts at rice university. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", gas prices and alternative energy efforts. long-term unemployment benefits and why they may end in january without congressional action is discussed. after that, dominic chu describes what wall street investors are doing with their money in excess of the fiscal cliff. close plus your e-mails and phone calls and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights, watch key public policy events, and every weekend, the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules on the website and join in the the conversation on social media sites. >> representatives met in nova scotia earlier this month before the house. this is one hour and
. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this has been going back for centuries. how we engage with that? remapped welcome of, the problem that has been happening today in syria, there is no one to fill the vacuum of bashar al-assad's falling. the new coalition of the opposition -- the syrian opposition, they get together and they elected a leader. that leadership is not a leadership that has been outside syria for 20 years. it is for people who actually were in syria until recently. jenna: there are questions about that leadership and whether it is genuine or whether or not it is the second in command, the muslim brotherhood member is someone that should be looked at again. thomas friedman makes this argument today th
with syria, something with china. >> something with something we don't know. >> something with something. the unknown unknowns as donald rumsfeld would say. >> right. >> is there any way to prepare for them? what does history tell us. >> no is the short answer, except that you prepare for leadership and hopefully you learn all the way along. i think president kennedy's great example of that. i think the conventional historical wisdom about learning from the bay of pigs and the pay juf from the missile crisis is true. he was able to understand that the generals weren't always right and to wait and to always put yourself in the other guy's sho shoes, which is a hugely important lesson and all these presidents understood. so in a sense you prepare for crisis, you prepare to deal with competing forces, and also incoming and seemingly contradictory information. even in this era where the president of the united states is watching in real time the operation to take out bin laden, even with that, there is a fog of war, there is a fog of information, and a president is paid to make sure that whe
northern border given the increasing anarchy inside syria and the potential the spillover into lebanon and across israel's border. much like the squeeze they felt in 2006. i think we're entering into a time of real danger and potential hostilities on both sides of the israeli border. lou: your thoughts. >> the brigade, the commander of which was killed by the israelis , are really the strategic army of hamas. my concern is that hamas has to a strategic alliances, one basically with the muslim brotherhood now in charge of egypt, but more importantly with the iranian regime. hamas is escalating against the israelis was prompted their response to put pressure on israel and divert the attention from syria. that is the way to get out of the syrian complex situation. this is a challenge to the administration. wh would you do if israel takes out the hamas military leader? it's a big question. lou: and a question that we're going to turn to judy miller for the answer when we come back. is this a strategic response that will drive straight at the heart of the iranians and put in jeopardy their
continues in syria. . anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. with less chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine living your life with less chronic low back pain. imagine you, with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people taking maois or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymbalta. taking it with nsaid p
to facebook for help and a possible turning point in syria. the obama administration tonight weighing whether to take a big step and involve arming the rebels. but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit alka-seltzer on facebook. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or v
turning point in syria. the obama administration tonight weighing whether to take a big step and involve arming the rebels. ded it. and that makes me feel pretty good about it. and then i heard about a study looking at multivitamins and the long term health benefits. and what do you know? they used centrum silver in the study. makes me feel even better, that's what i take. sorry, we take. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. with two times the points on dining in restaurants,? you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call
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